Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE! Intense.
devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE!

Intense.

devidsketchbook:

Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie

Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was given a Polaroid camera. Working under the moniker, The Polaroid Kidd, Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the U.S. amassing an archive of photographs that would go on to make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Having never undergone any formal training, he chose to remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of the art market.

Via LEE FUCKEN DALE!

amandamarsalis:

Mendocino Coast

May 2012

California, USA

After Sandy by Peter van Agtmael

Scene from the Oakwood Beach neighborhood of Staten Island, November 3rd. 

My view first thing this morning. by Alina Kulesh

alinakulesh:

California dreaming.

Los Angeles in Fog by Tom Anderson (yeah.. that Tom Anderson)

LA, USA

The Relaxed Observer (San Francisco Fire 1906) by Arnold Genthe

Needless to say, a picture tells a story, but it might just be the story we want to hear or see. But whatever it is, there is something in photography that can make us do all kinds of things, which includes smiling for the camera even when we’re standing in front of a city on fire.

San Francisco, USA

Via rarepandajoy